Who’s Afraid of Rising Interest Rates?

While mortgage rates remain “historically low,” many first-time buyers think they’re substantially more expensive because they don’t remember high-rate years.

1st Time Homebuyers

[Move.com] Rising mortgage rates have created an urgency for Experienced Purchasers to buy before further increases. Average listing views on realtor.com surged 40% to 80% in the last 3 weeks of December 2016 compared to December 2015.

“Rising rates have made demand even more intense,” realtor.com notes. However, the demand mostly seems to be coming on stronger from repeat buyers. For first-time buyers, rising mortgage rates are having an opposite effect and they’re showing signs of beginning to shy away from the market.

The number of 1st-time buyers planning to purchase this spring has dropped sharply and the rise in mortgage rates over the past few weeks may be to blame for their retreat, according to realtor.com® study. Repeat buyers, on the other hand, want to lock in rates right away.

Forty-four percent of active home buyers who plan to buy a home this spring are first-time home buyers, down from 55% last fall who said they were planning to buy in the spring. So what’s spooking them?

Average rates today are about a half percentage point higher than they were in 2016. That means a median-priced home financed with a 20% down would cost an extra $720 per year in added interest, realtor.com.

If you want to own your first home, now is STILL the time to buy!

First-time buyers are nearly 5 times more likely than repeat buyers to say they are facing challenges qualifying for a mortgage. Affordability topped first-time buyer concerns.

In November, first-time buyers made up 32% of all buyers, according to the National Association of Realtors.

“The rise in rates is associated with an anticipation of stronger economic and wage growth, both of which favor buyers,” adds Jonathan Smoke chief economist for realtor.com. “At the same time, higher rates make qualifying for a mortgage and finding affordable inventory more challenging. The decline in the share of first-time buyers since October suggests that the move up in rates is discouraging new home buyers already.”

On the other hand, repeat homebuyers realize mortgage rates – while moving higher overall – are still at historical lows. Before rates jump more, these buyers are in a rush to close before rates increase further, according to realtor.com’s study.

First-time buyers may need to lower their expectations a little and not insist on a dream home…  Their perfect home is out there, it just takes a different approach  and process to finding it.  Please give us a call, we would love to help you.

http://www.ForeSiteResidential.com

Advertisements

A Look at New Homes: Onward and Upward in 2017

Housing Outlook

© 2017 Florida Realtors — Fueled by a growing economy, solid employment gains and rising household formations, single-family housing production will continue a gradual, upward trajectory in 2017, according to economists speaking at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) International Builders’ Show in Orlando, Fla.

“While positive developments on the demand side will support solid growth in the single-family housing sector in 2017, builders in many markets continue to face supply-side constraints led by the three ‘Ls’ – lots, labor and lending,” said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz.

He said that 64 percent of builders nationwide report low or very-low lot supplies; the rate of unfilled jobs in the construction sector is now higher; and acquisition, development and construction loans for builders – while on the rise – needs to grow faster to meet demand.

“The industry needs to recruit more workers and get more land in the pipeline, but it will take time,” Dietz said.

However, supply-side challenges are more than offset by continued economic growth, ongoing job creation, rising wages and favorable demographics. Moreover, builder confidence is higher because builders expect the incoming Trump administration to help to lower regulatory costs.

“Regulatory requirements make up nearly 25 percent of the cost of a new home,” said Dietz. “Given those constraints, it is hard to build a $200,000 entry-level house.”

In a sign that more millennials are getting off the sidelines and jumping into the market, Dietz noted that townhome construction, which can be a useful bridge for millennials to transition to homeownership, is showing impressive growth and now constitutes 12 percent of all single-family starts.

Solid outlook

  • NAHB expects mortgage interest rates to average 4.5 percent in 2017 and 5.3 percent in 2018.
  • NAHB projects 1.16 million total housing starts in 2016, up 4.9 percent from the previous year’s total of 1.11 million units.
  • Single-family production is expected to rise 10 percent in 2017 to 855,000 units and increase an additional 12 percent to 961,000 next year.
  • Using the 2000-2003 period as a benchmark for normal housing activity when single-family production averaged 1.3 million units annually, single-family starts are expected to steadily rise from 56 percent of “a typical market” in third quarter 2016 to 75 percent of normal by fourth quarter 2018.
  • On the multifamily front, NAHB expects multifamily starts to hold steady in 2017 at 384,000 units, which would be 1,000 units above last year’s pace. While this level is slightly above trend, Dietz said the pace is sustainable due to demographics and a balance between supply and demand.
  • Residential remodeling activity is expected to register a 1 percent gain this year over 2016.

Affordability and demographics

CoreLogic Chief Economist Frank Nothaft expects mortgage rates to rise and home prices to moderate in the coming year.

“We anticipate that a stronger economy will translate into higher mortgage rates,” said Nothaft. “Meanwhile, we expect moderation in 2017 for rent and home price growth, but it will still be higher than inflation (thanks to) tight inventory in the housing market.” He said home purchase originations should rise 5.7 percent in 2017, and credit risk for home loans is substantially lower than 10-15 years ago.

The biggest housing issue in 2017 will be affordability, Nothaft said. “Mortgage rates are up three-quarters of a point since last summer and house prices are up. That starts to pinch a household budget.”

On the flip side, demographics will be very positive for housing and home sales going forward. “As millennials age from 25-to-30, that is a big potential base to expand the home buyer market,” said Nothaft.

Supply and demand

David Berson, chief economist for Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., also expects mortgage rates to rise in the coming year, but he said it shouldn’t have a negative impact on housing demand.

“Higher mortgage rates will be offset by stronger wage gains and job growth, which suggests that housing demand will increase this year,” said Berson. “The question is, how much will supply go up?” He said most U.S. metro areas are relatively healthy, marked by solid job growth, mortgage delinquencies down to near-normal levels and strong, but not excessive house price gains.

A major concern going into 2017, he said, is that demand will exceed supply, which puts upward pressure on home prices.

“If there aren’t enough homes on the market, that will be a problem,” said Berson. “Price gains need to moderate. We can’t have six, seven or eight percent gains. That is not sustainable.” That situation could downgrade many markets from “healthy” to “neutral.”

© 2017 Florida Realtors

How the Trump Presidency Will Impact Housing in 2017

Trump's Impact on Housing

Donald Trump, the real estate tycoon, will be our nation’s 45th president. That’s good news for the housing industry, right? Well, there’s a lot to consider. Here’s how the Trump presidency may impact housing and homeownership in 2017 via NerdWallet.

A ‘responsibly aggressive’ marketplace

A unified call for less government regulation is coming from the Trump camp as well as Republicans in Congress. On the deregulation radar: the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and other elements of Dodd-Frank, the Wall Street reform act that President Obama signed into law in 2010.

“Since the elections, there has been much discussion of how expected changes under a Trump administration are likely to reduce the [CFPB’s] impact, particularly in the enforcement arena,” says Rob Chrisman, a senior advisor for the Stratmor Group, a mortgage industry consultancy. “Dodd-Frank will not be eliminated. It will be refined — which is a good thing.”

Jeff Taylor is managing partner of Digital Risk, a mortgage processing company. He also says trimming Dodd-Frank would be a good thing for potential homeowners.

“If Dodd-Frank is streamlined, I think you could have banks be more responsibly aggressive in the marketplace, as far as making mortgages,” he says. “And I think that will open up more product for first-time homebuyers … in the next couple of years.”

Taylor says less stringent regulations on lenders might lower the costs of compliance and allow more small community banks to compete with big banks, “boosting bank profits — all of which are likely to increase credit availability.”

However, critics like Noah Smith, former assistant professor of finance at Stony Brook University, worry that deregulation will dial banking risk back up and, perhaps more importantly, put taxpayers back on the hook to bail out the bad actors. Just as during the housing crisis of 10 years ago, it would be another “race to the bottom,” Smith wrote in a Bloomberg analysis.

But a reduction in federal regulations won’t transform the housing industry, Chrisman says. “Trump may mean less federal enforcement, but the states will remain aggressive. Politicians in California, Illinois and New York, primarily Democratic states, have already mentioned a stepped-up regulatory atmosphere,” he says.

Getting Fannie and Freddie ‘out of government ownership’

Another item on the Republican agenda is to reduce the government footprint in the mortgage industry. That means moving Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into the private sector.

The two government-sponsored companies back a majority of mortgages and were bailed out with taxpayer dollars during the housing crash. Fannie and Freddie buy home loans from lenders and then package and sell those loans in large bundles of bonds.

The quarterly profits that Fannie and Freddie earn are now funneled to the U.S. Treasury, which has been paid back $60 billion more than it provided in bailout funding to the companies. Investors in Fannie and Freddie want to see that money move back into the private sector.

In November, Trump’s Treasury secretary nominee, Steven Mnuchin, told Fox Business Network, “We gotta get Fannie and Freddie out of government ownership.”

“I think there are models that could work,” Taylor says regarding Fannie and Freddie privatization. “What I don’t think you could see is a model [where] the U.S. government doesn’t stand 100% explicitly behind the bonds that Fannie and Freddie issue.”

He says removing that federal guarantee would reduce the global demand for the mortgage-backed securities that the two quasi-government agencies issue. Those bonds are instrumental in freeing up capital for lenders to make more loans.

Homebuilders and a Trump economy

A lack of skilled labor has been one of the biggest constraints to the housing industry for the past couple of years, and Taylor worries that the Trump administration may not help matters in that regard.

“Mr. Trump’s plan to spend money on infrastructure projects around the country could result in more laborers taking those jobs and leaving homebuilders short-handed,” Taylor says. “Also, his immigration stance is likely to keep immigrants out of the country and out of the workforce — a blow to homebuilders who rely on immigrants for many construction jobs.”

Labor shortages also contribute to rising wages for construction workers, which in turn keep new home prices high, he adds.

However, Robert Dietz, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders, says he expects the Trump administration to take action on some labor rules that could benefit the homebuilding industry. That will almost certainly include the Obama overtime rule “that would’ve affected a lot of construction site managers,” Dietz says.

That rule, blocked by a federal judge on Nov. 22, aimed to double the maximum income a worker could earn and still be eligible for mandatory overtime pay. The new limit of $47,500 would have given 4.2 million more Americans the opportunity to earn overtime, according to the Obama administration.

Dietz also is looking for a Trump administration to help lower building costs. “Just under 25% of the cost of a newly built home is due to regulatory burdens,” he says. “I think it’s reasonable that the new administration can address a lot of them.”

How Trump might affect home affordability

Mortgage rates have soared since Trump won the election. That’s part of a good news/bad news scenario.

“One could argue that the Trump victory has driven up interest rates due to the fear of future inflation, given his tax and infrastructure build proposals,” Chrisman says. “This increase in rates certainly negatively impacts homeownership for first-time buyers. Increasing interest rates, however, often signal a strengthening economy, and if that is the case, more first-time borrowers will qualify.”

Taylor also says home affordability could suffer but offers another factor in the equation. “On the positive side, [higher mortgage rates] could also slow price appreciation, which would help buyers. The housing market has lacked first-time buyers and move-up buyers. Slower price appreciation could benefit move-up buyers who have regained value in their home and want to move up before prices rise again,” he says.

“I’ll tell you, if I’m looking to buy a house for the first time or to sell my house and move into a different house, I really am looking at this next year as probably a moving year because rates still in the 4s are very, very attractive,” Taylor adds.

Will Trump eliminate the mortgage interest deduction?

And then there’s the most sacred cow of all: the mortgage interest deduction. It is frequently mentioned as an important factor in the “buy or rent?” conversation.

The Trump administration and Republicans have floated the idea of putting a cap on the amount of allowed interest that you could deduct from your tax bill.

The thing is, an analysis by the Tax Policy Center of the Urban Institute and Brookings Institution says only about one-fifth of households actually use the deduction. And of those that do, most are way above middle-class taxpayers.

“The Tax Policy Center finds that in 2017, Trump’s cap would affect only about 160,000 singles, a tiny fraction of the 89 million single taxpayers, and about 230,000 couples out of 59 million joint filers,” Howard Gleckman, senior fellow with the Tax Policy Center, writes on Forbes.com. “The vast majority of the taxpayers who would face the cap are high-income.”

Homeownership rates under a Trump presidency

Chrisman is looking for little change in the rate of homeownership in the coming years. From a percentage perspective, homeownership in the U.S. reached its peak during the Clinton/Bush presidential terms, he says. But that’s when banks relaxed underwriting guidelines to such an extent that “people who shouldn’t have been buying houses were.”

The housing crash changed everything. Underwriting, loan documentation and appraisal requirements have strengthened since then. “Marginal borrowers are not borrowing money, and investors feel more secure with investing in mortgage-backed securities,” Chrisman says.

He says that America’s need for housing is just as great as ever and that Trump’s policies won’t move the dial on homeownership rates one way or the other.

“Internal population growth hasn’t stopped, nor has immigration. Nor has the desire for a new generation to want a home for their children,” he says. “I think that from what we know so far, the Trump presidency will have little or no direct impact on homeownership rates.”

A positive outlook for the New Year

All in all, the experts we spoke with are optimistic about 2017. Lenders are using better technology to streamline the mortgage process, and the housing market is “healthy” and “robust,” in their words.

“Builders are excited,” Dietz says. He says reductions in regulatory costs could help homebuilders provide housing to the tightest segment of the market, the entry-level buyer.

“If we do get an administration that’s taking a look at various kinds of regulatory policies — where they’ve grown too large or too expensive — that will certainly be a help [to] the supply side of the market. And I think that’s good news, not just for builders, but it’s good news for renters and prospective homebuyers because adding supply is the way that you address housing affordability issues.”

via Hal Bundrick, a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website.

Coaching Your Sales Team Is Easier than You Think!

Successful Sales Coaching

Selling Power:  Research shows that ongoing coaching that follows sales training has 400% more impact on productivity than sales training delivered without coaching. As a result, it’s no wonder sales coaching is a hot topic among leading sales managers. In addition, a landmark CEB study of sales teams showed that coaching delivered by managers is more than twice as effective as coaching by high performing peers – or even an internal sales trainer.

There are numerous benefits of managers providing coaching to their direct reports. These include:

  1. Coaching drives higher performance. According to research by CSO insights, companies with formal sales coaching programs report 18% higher win rates than those with discretionary or informal programs.
  2. Coaching creates transparency and trust. Coaching provides an opportunity for the manager to talk one-on-one with – and really listen to – their sales associates. This increased time and attention increases transparency, builds trust, and fosters stronger relationships.
  3. Coaching increases employee engagement. Research shows that salespeople who have received quality coaching report higher engagement levels and are far more likely to stay with their company. With the cost of replacing a sales associate somewhere between two and 10 times their salary, this increased retention represents a significant dollar savings!

Deciding what to coach on is typically quite simple. Viewing a sales presentation will give some sense of the initial needs, or even just asking sales associates which parts of the sales process make them most uncomfortable will yield some areas for coaching.

Common topics for sales coaching include:

  • Delivering an elevator pitch
  • Discovery
  • Handling objections
  • Competitive differentiation
  • Pricing negotiation
  • Closing the deal

For managers who haven’t established a habit of providing coaching, here are some steps to begin the process:

  1. Declare your intent. Share your coaching plans with your boss and ask him or her to hold you accountable for following through. In addition, explaining to your team that you are making coaching a priority will set the stage for successful initial sessions. The public nature of these declarations will help you follow through on your promise!
  2. Establish a schedule. Setting a regular schedule elevates the importance of coaching in the minds of your team, showing that you’re serious about it. Consistency also makes keeping your commitment easier since your time is already blocked off for coaching.
  3. Leverage technology. Using tools which deliver on-demand video-based coaching, can make the experience easier, less time consuming, and more effective for both managers and sales associates.

Once you’ve taken the plunge, you’re likely to find that delivering coaching is easier than you think. The simplest method is “directive coaching.” Feedback is delivered as a statement and is based on your observations and expertise. For example, you might recommend that an associate be more aggressive when asking for a next meeting.

A more advanced form of coaching is “non-directive coaching,” which is delivered in the form of questions. This prompts the sales associate to diagnose his or her own performance and identify potential areas for improvement. For example, you might ask, “How do you feel about the way you asked for a follow-up meeting?” This approach leads to self-assessment by the associate and helps create the need and desire to improve in certain areas.

As your coaching experience evolves, you’ll increase in skill, confidence, and effectiveness while you help your direct reports identify and work on areas for improvement. So, good luck sales manager. Now, get coaching!

via Mat Greenfield, coaching consultant at HireVue. He is a learning and development geek with a passion for helping people be the best they can be through training and coaching. Learn more about HireVue on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Ben Carson… HUD Secretary

President-elect says his former rival has ‘a brilliant mind and is passionate about strengthening communities’.

It’s official: retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson will serve as President-elect Donald Trump’s secretary for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), so long as Congress confirms him.

“I am thrilled to nominate Dr. Ben Carson as our next Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development,” Trump said in a statement. “Ben Carson has a brilliant mind and is passionate about strengthening communities and families within those communities.”

“We have talked at length about my urban renewal agenda and our message of economic revival, very much including our inner cities. Ben shares my optimism about the future of our country and is part of ensuring that this is a presidency that represents all Americans.”

HUD “oversees homeownership, low-income housing assistance, fair housing laws, homelessness, aid for distressed neighborhoods, and housing development,” according to its website.

Today, Carson posted on message on Facebook that said, “I am honored and look forward to working hard on behalf of the American people.”

Ben Carson

The news comes after Trump tweeted about his interest in Carson about two weeks ago. Moreover, on Monday, Nov. 28, sources “close to the appointment” confirmed to HousingWire that Ben Carson would officially accept the role.

“After serious discussions with the Trump transition team, I feel that I can make a significant contribution particularly to making our inner cities great for everyone,” Carson wrote. “We have much work to do in strengthening every aspect of our nation and ensuring that both our physical infrastructure and our spiritual infrastructure is solid.”

Previously, Carson suggested he wasn’t interested in a government position after being offered the job as head of the Department of Health and Human Services a few weeks ago.

But the doctor wavered on this message, later stating on Facebook that “if called upon, I would serve inside of the government.”

If confirmed, Carson will be the first African American appointed to a senior position in Trump’s cabinet. He would replace Julián Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio, and President Obama’s appointee since 2014. Prior to Castro, New York City’s housing commissioner Shaun Donovan filled the role.

Given Carson’s health care background (he was the director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins until his 2013 retirement), Trump’s decision breaks the tradition of appointing HUD secretaries with local government or housing and real estate experience.

“Realtors know that the incoming Secretary of Housing and Urban Development has a big job ahead,” said National Association of Realtors president William E. Brown in a statement. “Potential homebuyers face a range of hurdles, from rising prices to mortgage credit that’s burdened by fees and extra costs.

“We congratulate Dr. Carson on accepting this important challenge and wish him the very best of luck in meeting the task ahead. While we’ve made great strides in recent years, far more can be done to put the dream of homeownership in reach for more Americans. The National Association of Realtors and its 1.2 million members looks forward to working with Dr. Carson to fulfill this important mission.”

“The choice of Ben Carson is about more than FHA premiums and rules, but it will play a role,” said Ken Trepeta, executive director at RESPRO (Real Estate Services Providers Council), in a statement.

“This choice is about a vision to use HUD as a leading force in President-elect Trump’s effort to renew our cities an reach out to African Americans, Hispanics, and others who live in those areas. We at RESPRO look forward to working with Dr. Carson.”

In a Nov. 23 statement, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition Diane Yentel, emphasized the critical responsibilities of HUD, to include:

  • federal rental assistance programs that serve over 5 million of the country’s lowest income households
  • administering tens of billions of dollars in community development, disaster recovery and homeless assistance funding
  • enforcing fair housing laws
  • acting as one of the largest mortgage insurers in the world
  • alleviating poverty
  • stabilizing and revitalizing communities
  • increasing the educational attainment and incomes of low income families
    providing safe, affordable homes to deeply poor elderly or disabled families

“With so many qualified candidates to choose from with deep knowledge of, and commitment to affordable housing solutions for the poorest families, and with the housing crisis reaching new heights across the country, Dr. Ben Carson’s nomination to serve as HUD secretary is surprising and concerning, given his lack of experience with or knowledge of the programs he would oversee,” Yentel said.

“The little that we do know about Dr. Carson’s position on affordable housing is a reason for concern. In July 2015, Dr. Carson published an editorial describing fair housing as an Obama administration ‘experiment,’ revealing a fundamental misunderstanding of obligations that have been around since 1968, the year the Fair Housing Act was made law.”

She added: “Ultimately, fair housing means all families, including the poorest ones, are able to choose the neighborhoods in which to live based on what’s best for themselves and their families. Providing this choice requires that we work towards making every community one of opportunity. This goal — and the affirmatively furthering fair housing rule as a means to achieve it — should fit squarely within President-elect Trump’s urban revitalization plan.”

via Caroline Feeney, Inman News

Why Do You Think Mortgage Interest Rates Are Increasing?

Mortgage Interest Rates

According to Freddie Mac’s latest Primary Mortgage Market Survey, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage interest rate recently jumped up to 3.94%. Interest rates had been hovering around 3.5% since June, and many are wondering why there has been such a significant increase so quickly.

Why did rates go up?
Whenever there is a presidential election, there is uncertainty in the markets as to who will win. One way that this is noticeable is through the actions of investors. As we get closer to the first Tuesday of November, many investors pull their funds from the more volatile and less predictive stock market and instead, choose to invest in Treasury Bonds.

When this happens, the interest rate on Treasury Bonds does not have to be as high to entice investors to buy them, so interest rates go down. Once the elections are over and a President has been elected, investors return to the stock market and other investments, leaving the Treasury to raise rates to make bonds more attractive again.

Simply put, the better the economy, the higher interest rates will go. For a more detailed explanation of the many factors that contribute to whether interest rates go up or down, you can follow this great link to Investopedia.

The Good News
Even though rates are closer to 4% than they have been in nearly 6 months, they are still slightly below where we started 2016, at 3.97%.

The great news is that even at 4%, rates are still significantly lower than they have been over the last 4 decades.

Any increase in interest rate will impact your monthly housing costs when you secure a mortgage to buy your home. A recent Wall Street Journal article points out that, “While still only roughly half the average over the past 45 years, according to Freddie Mac, the quick rise has lenders worried that home loans could become more expensive far sooner than anticipated.”

Tom Simons, a Senior Economist at Jefferies LLC, touched on another possible outcome for higher rates:

“First-time buyers look at the monthly total, at what they can afford, so if the mortgage is eaten up by a higher interest expense then there’s less left over for price, for the principal. Buyers will be shopping in a lower price bracket; thus demand could shift a bit.”

Key Take-Away

Interest rates are impacted by many factors, and even though they have increased recently, rates would have to reach 9.1% for renting to be cheaper than buying. Rates haven’t been that high since January of 1995, according to Freddie Mac.

Give us a call… we can and will help you find the perfect home in spite of this rate bump.  www.ForeSiteResidential.com

Thanks to Keeping Current Matters for their facts and narrative.

From Empty Nest to Full House… Multigenerational Families Are Back!

Multi-Generational Homes

Quick take-away…

Multigenerational households are making a comeback. While it is a shift from the more common nuclear home, these households might be the answer that many families are looking for as home prices continue to rise in response to a lack of housing inventory.

Multigenerational homes are coming back in a big way!

In the 1950s, about 21%, or 32.2 million Americans shared a roof with their grown children or parents. According to a recent Pew Research Center report, the number of multigenerational homes dropped to as low as 12% in 1980 but has shot back up to 19%, roughly 60.6 million people, as recently as 2014.

Multigenerational households typically occur when adult children (over the age of 25) either choose to, or need to, remain living in their parent’s home, and then have children of their own. These households also occur when grandparents join their adult children and grandchildren in their home.

According to the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) 2016 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers, 11% of home buyers purchased multigenerational homes last year. The top 3 reasons for purchasing this type of home were:

  • To take care of aging parents (19%)
  • Cost savings (18%, up from 15% last year)
  • Children over the age of 18 moving back home (14%, up from 11% last year)

Donna Butts, Executive Director of Generations United, points out that,

“As the face of America is changing, so are family structures. It shouldn’t be a taboo or looked down upon if grown children are living with their families or older adults are living with their grown children.”

For a long time, nuclear families (a couple and their dependent children) became the accepted norm, but John Graham, co-author of “Together Again: A Creative Guide to Successful Multigenerational Living,” says, “We’re getting back to the way human beings have always lived in – extended families.”

This shift can be attributed to several social changes over the decades. Growing racial and ethnic diversity in the U.S. population helps explain some of the rise in multigenerational living. The Asian and Hispanic populations are more likely to live in multigenerational family households and these two groups are growing rapidly.

Additionally, women are a bit more likely to live in multigenerational conditions than are their male counterparts (20% vs. 18%, respectively). Last but not least, basic economics.

Carmen Multhauf, co-author of the book “Generational Housing: Myth or Mastery for Real Estate,” brings to light the fact that rents and home prices have been skyrocketing in recent years. She says that, “The younger generations have not been able to save,” and often struggle to get good-paying jobs.

via KCM Crew